Review of Intellectual Property Law Blog

  • Fall 2013 RIPL Symposium: IP Rights, Ownership and Identity in Social Media

Can You Spot the Knock-Off? The Dangers of China’s Intellectual Property Violations and America’s Response

By Jessica Pavlock, J.D. Candidate 2017 on Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

Last Friday the United States launched an investigation into China’s alleged theft of United States intellectual property.[1]  As the country’s leading trading partner, and at a time when the relationship between China and the U.S. is necessary to contain the North Korean nuclear threat,[2] many questions if such an investigation is truly necessary.  However, the…

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The Grinch Teaches Fair Use

By Angela Curry, J.D. Candidate 2018 on Friday, August 18th, 2017

It’s not quite Christmas yet but it looks like the Grinch who stole Christmas is making a cameo this summer to teach us all about Parody and Fair Use. Broadway Playwright Mathew Lombardo created a hilariously evil sequel to the famous children’s story How The Grinch Stole Christmas last year and planned to debut the…

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Can’t Take My Eyes Off Of $345 Million: How Spotify’s Alleged Licensing Mishaps May Lead to a Large Payout to Bob Gaudio of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons

By Deidre Davis, J.D. Candidate 2018 on Monday, August 7th, 2017

Twenty years ago, an individual trying to listen to their favorite songs would have to carry around multiple compact discs and a similarly situated portable compact disc player. Today, however, the vast majority of music fanatics can have their songs right at their fingertips without the heavy luggage of the past. Spotify is one of…

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A Final Victory for Google: Verb Use Does Not Signify Trademark Genericide

By Paul Sanders, JD Candidate 2018 on Thursday, July 20th, 2017

The Lanham Act states that a registered trademark can be canceled if it becomes a “generic name for the goods or services, or a portion thereof, for which it is registered.”[1] Trademark Genericide can be defined as the loss of trademark rights when a term enters common usage and consumers begin to denote a particular…

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Unbreakable First Amendment: SCOTUS Says No to the Disparagement Clause

By Gina Chereck, J.D. Candidate 2018 on Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

Season 3 of the Netflix series, “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” features a story arc about the Native American socialite, Jacqueline Voorhees, taking down the Washington Redskins.[1]  In the series, Voorhees and her boyfriend (a fictional Snyder) devise a plan to get the Redskins organization to change its name.[2]  While the series’ writers, the U.S. Patent and…

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